Bug Driven Development

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It is a sad fact of life that, in this day and age, arguments are not won with sound logic and reasoning. Instead, applying the principle of framing an argument is much more effective at swaying public opinion.

1364145387\_b8cf994488 So the next time you try to make headway introducing Test Driven Development (or even simply introducing writing automated unit tests at all) into an organization and are rebuffed with...

Don’t bring your fancy schmancy flavor of the week agile manifesto infested “methodology” here kiddo. I’ve been writing software my way for a loooong time...

You can reply with...

I’m sorry, but I’m not a fan of Bug Driven Development. I think Test Driven Development is not without its challenges, but it’s a better alternative. Either you’re with us, or against us. Are you a bug lover? Bug Driven Development gives comfort to the bugs.

UPDATE: this is an example of my dry humor. I don’t believe that “Framing” is a good way to win an argument and I would never actually say or recommend saying anything similar to to this. It’s meant as a bit of a joke, but with a point.

A team that is not focused on automated testing of some sort throughout the lifecycle of the project is effectively embracing Bug Driven Development. Bugs are going to drive the development cycle at the end of the project.

Don’t believe me though, look at the research done by others. In Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering, Robert Glass points out...

Fact 31. Error removal is the most time-consuming phase of the life cycle.

In Rapid Development, Steve McConnell relates...

Shortcutting 1 day of QA activity early in the project is likely to cost you from 3 to 10 days of activity downstream.

In other words, if you don’t control the bugs, the bugs control your schedule.

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