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Party Mode Button It is so easy to get caught up in your day to day work and home duties and forget to take a break to really cut loose. The answer, my friends, is that big red button in the image to the left there. That there initiates Party Mode! Set this sucker up in your office or home bedroom, and whenever life catches up to you… Instant Party!

This here is the invention of some MIT students who pimped their dorm room with an instant rave setup. We are talking six video cameras, electric blinds, lights, laser, LED screens, music server, voice activation, blacklights, fog machine, etc etc…

Scroll down to see a couple videos they post of the setup in action. Now all they have to do to complete the club experience is charge $5 for a bottle of water and $12 for a crappily mixed drink in a plastic cup. Brilliant!

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Lest you think I sit around spending all my time on computer games and soccer, I also try to write occasionally.

Today an article I have been working for a while has finally been published on DevSource. It is entitled a A Developer’s Introduction to Microformats and attempts to present a clear introductory look at Microformats. This is my second article for DevSource, the first being one I helped that crazy Bob Reselman write.

I was fired up to write this article after attending the Mix06 conference. Hearing Bill Gates mention Microformats (whether O’Reilly fed it to him or not) highlights the fact that Microformats are poised to really take off. There are some detractors and potential real problems with syndicating Microformats, so it will be interesting to see how they are solved.

In any case, check it out and let me know what you think. Did I present it well?

And before I forget, big ups to the Microformats mailing list for helping me think through some of these topics I covered.

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I once thought I was a bit of a blogging addict. To get settled into work I would read my blogs. I’d tune back in while eating my lunch. And if I went on vacation, I thought about the huge number of unread feeds. Heck, I even went and got involved in RSS Bandit and Subtext so that I could work on the means of delivering blogs.

Oblivion Box But now I realized that my blogging addiction is merely the mild craving for milk after a cookie. I have discovered what true addiction is, and its name is Oblivion.

Steve Yegge was right when he says…

…if you’re not playing Oblivion, then I highly, nay strongly recommend that you don’t start, or you’ll suddenly develop an aversion to Real Life…

This is quite simply the best computer game I have ever had the pleasure to play. I remember spending hours as a kid playing such classics as the Phantasie, Ultima III, Ultima IV, The Bard’s Tale and Dungeon Master. Dungeon Master at the time elevated the FRPG genre for me because it was the first that really incorporated first person realtime playing. But I remember drawing up plans for the ultimate game. Apparently Bethesda swiped those plans from my brain and decided to do even better.

So why is this game so damn addicting? It is a combination of a lot of things really. First, the skill based system really seems to mean something. I remember there was never a point in playing a thief in most role playing games because you would just get killed first. Most games were simply hack and slash fight your way out of every situation.

Oblivion Screenshot But with Oblivion, you have the opportunity to really put those sneaking and lockpicking skills to good use in daring missions where simply blasting your way through really isn’t a good option. I also like the fact that lock-picking isn’t simply rolling a die and comparing it to a skill (though you can resort to that option). You have the ability to actually try and pick that lock.

If there were no other characters in the game, it would be like Myst, but with the ability to fully explore your environment. The scenery in this game is jaw dropping.

But ultimately, I think the open-ended gameplay really kicks it up a notch. After a short stint as a gladiator (got my ass handed to me) my character is now working his way up the Thieves guild and trying to advance in the Mage’s guild. At the beginning of the game, some important Emporer got shanked and I am supposed to deliver his amulet somewhere, but I sort of got sidetracked.

Now I am travelling around, checking out the scenery, and getting way too little sleep. I suppose I should look into delivering this amulet, but first I have some pilfered goods to fence off and I want to help this half-orc reclaim his heritage.

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Pen I write this blog post with apologies to Dale Carnegie for the play on the title of his book.

Today, Jeff Atwood writes about the difference between writing and copywriting. His essential point is that good copyrighting is marketing and is boring. Good writing on the other hand is engaging and not boring. Understand the difference?

I think this dovetails nicely into another article I read recently at A List Apart entitled Calling All Designers: Learn to Write!

Derek Powazek points out that creating a good user experience goes beyond rounded corners and visual design. Good writing is an essential part of creating a great user experience. He sites Flickr as one example of getting it right. Rather than a button that says Submit they have a button that says Get in there. That really is friendlier isn’t it.

When you think about it, using plain casual English is much more natural for people to read. How often in the real-world do you hear people asking you to submit anything except when submitting a drug test or tax forms in triplicate?

So I took a look at my blog and noticed that in the front end, there is pretty much only one button that people use on a daily basis and it said Comment. So I changed it to Leave Your Mark and sat back waiting for the accolades to roll in on the improved user experience. Anybody hear crickets?

Well it is going to take more than changing a single button to improve the overall user experience here. I will actually have to start writing well and quit using this random copy generator. But these are definitely insights I want to take into consideration when I get around to tweaking and updating the admin interface to Subtext. What are areas in which we can improve the writing? How can we improve the user experience? Little touches add up to a lot in creating a great experience.

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I recently set up Payroll via Paychex for my company. It is an eye opener to see exactly what taxes an employer pays on top of the taxes already deducted from each employee’s paycheck. I mean, I always heard that my employers were paying taxes for me when I was an employee, but I never knew how much. Till now.

This is helpful when figuring out your total compensation as it is part of the hidden cost of going into business for yourself. Of course, we are a C-Corp so these figure may be different for other types of businesses. I wouldn’t know and this does not qualify as tax advice.

Tax Breakdown

Tax Rate
Social Security 6.2%
Medicare 1.45%
Federal Unemployment 0.8%
State Unemployment 0.8%

State of CA. This changes.

Some Notes:

Social Security has a wage base limit of $94,200. So if an employee makes more than that (including bonuses etc…), the employer will only be taxed 6.2% of $94,200.

Medicare has no wage based limit.

The last two taxes are only taxed on the first $7000 of wages per employee per year. So the employer pays 3.4% of $7000 for each employee assuming each makes $7000 or more a year.

So make sure these figure into your cash-flow estimates. Also, don’t forget that by law, most companies are required to carry Workman’s compensation insurance. That will cost you a small chunk of change per year as well.

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Since I had a rough week last week, I thought I would post something fun today. While some people are just jumping on the dual-monitor bandwagon, I have recently moved on to three screens.

Three Screens

Of course that is not exactly true. The two screens on the right are attached to my new Dell Dimension 9150 workstation. The one on the left is attached to my old Shuttle system. That there is running the VMWare Server that hosts Subtext’s CruiseControl.NET build server.

The only reason I got the third screen is that because of a deal they were offering, it actually lowered the cost of the lease to get this screen than to not get it. You can’t beat a deal like that!

Rather than using a KVM, I am using MaxiVista to remote control the computer via the third monitor. That works pretty nicely, though MaxiVista seems to hiccup alot.

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So in the hustle and bustle of trying to get my Yahoo account back (it has been returned), I forgot to show some love for JackAce of the Code Turkey blog. He and I used to work at SkillJam and he was the one who alerted me via email that my account had been jacked.

In this post, he describes the general tactic that an Instant Messaging based attack takes to spread itself.

He also provides some tips to avoid phishing and talks about what to do if you are phised. Be careful out there.

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Stop Fraud! So after getting my Yahoo password phished, my wife reminded me that we should put a fraud alert on our credit file. I first heard about this from my friend Walter a while ago, but we never got around to it.

This is a flag that the major credit bureaus (experian, equifax, and TransUnion) attach to your credit report. If someone (including yourself) tries to open up a new credit account, the lender is supposed to (though not required by law) to contact you by phone to make sure that you really do want to open a new account.

Keep in mind that this applies to applying for a new credit card, obtaining a car loan, purchasing a cell phone, etc…

Setting up a fraud alert is pretty easy. There are three major credit bureaus you can call, but I prefer to do these things online. If you go to https://www.experian.com/fraud/, you can apply for the initial security alert (90 days) via the internet. They will forward the alert to the other two credit bureaus so you shouldn’s have to call them. One other benefit is that they let you print out your credit history online for free.

If you live in California, the protections are much better. According to California Law SB 168, you have the right to freeze your credit record at each bureau. This makes it impossible to issue credit in your name, even for someone armed with your name, address, Social Security Number, etc… To do this, you do need to contact each bureau in writing and send in $10.

For instructions on the benefits of a credit freeze and how to contact each credit bureau, check out this page on the Fight Identity Theft website.

Apparently similar laws apply to the following states at the time of this writing (CT, IL, LA, ME, NV, NC, TX, VT, WA).

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Fish UPDATE:I am back in business. I have re-obtained control over my Yahoo account. So the IM messages you receive from me are really from me. I won’t make this mistake twice.

Never operate a computer while sleep deprived. In fact, I am starting to think people should be licensed to get on the internet much like you do to drive a car. I am absolutely mortified to admit this, but I got suckered in a phishing attack that occurred via Yahoo Messenger.

I received an IM from a former boss with a link to a geocities photo gallery. When I clicked on the link, it looked just like a Yahoo photo gallery. Thinking (or rather not thinking), “Oh yeah, Yahoo owns Geocities now, right?” I logged in to see the photos. Big mistake. Right then I had the sneaking suspicion that I had done something painfully wrong.

And today, it was confirmed when a friend emailed me to tell me that I got my password jacked. If you see an IM from me or anyone with the link http://www.geocities.com/ladivabev/photos_pics.html (or rather any geocities link) DO NOT CLICK ON IT.

I cannot believe I fell for this. I am usually excellent at spotting and ignoring these, but everybody has their off days. And lately, I have had a string of them. I recently accidentally deleted all my backup data on my external hard-drive. Sleep deprivation is a killer.

And if you receive an IM or Yahoo message from me, please know it is not from me until further notice.

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Well this recent phishing attack is clear demonstration of the inherent dangers of homogeneity. Biologists and epidemologists have known this stuff for decades. Having given out my Yahoo password would have been much more disastrous if I was using Yahoo for my primary email address. Fortunately I use Gmail. Imagine the damage had I given out my Passport password. Egads!

Unfortunately I do use Yahoo Messenger. But I also use MSN and Skype. One password does not connect the bad guys with everything I use to communicate. But it is enough for them to do some damage. When you get an IM from a credible source, it is hard not to resist. It naturally brings your defenses down. A clever example of social engineering.

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Prolific blogger Mr. Jeff Atwood, author of the CodingHorror blog, paid us a surprise visit last night. He is in town for a couple of days to do something or other unimportant. He tried to explain something about presenting Team System to important people but all I heard was “blah blah TS blah blah”.

After a fine dinner at the new Ford Filling Station (owned by Harrison Ford’s son) we gathered around the screen and had a chat with the not-so-prolific blogger lately, Jon Galloway.

Jeff and Jon

So that there is Jeff on the left getting cozy with Jon on the right, who couldn’t make it in person but would like to thank the academy via live video feed courtesy of Skype™.

Jeff is one of the few people who regularly reads my blog through one of these antiquated mediums called a browser. Which is actually great since he gets to experience the very cool drop-shadow effects I apply to my photos. Go CSS!

After a bit of plotting to overtake the planet and typical jokes at each others expense, we all went our merry ways. Except for me, I live here.

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Cruise Control Logo With many thanks to Simone Chiaretta (blog in Italian) for his effort, we now have a working CruiseControl.NET setup for Subtext. Check out the chrome (or lack thereof) on our CCNET dashboard.

Though we have some kinks to work out (the build is apparently broken according to CCNET), I am particularly happy about getting this up and running. As a distributed open source project, it is part of our master plan to follow agile development practices that are well suited to building Subtext. Continuous integration is particularly important for us since we are in different time zones and locations.

The CCNet server is running on Windows 2003 within a VMWare Virtual Server on my old development workstation. That makes our build server very portable should we decide to host it elsewhere someday.

Once we get the kinks worked out, you can download the CCTray system tray applet and keep tabs on the development of Subtext. You’ll know exactly who and when someone breaks the build. How is that for open source?

To get CCTray to work, make sure your firewall allows TCP traffic over port 21234. Then add the server build.subtextproject.com:21234.

Though for now, let’s be adults and keep the teasing to a minimum. I apparently broke the build, but I am betting it is a configuration issue with moving the virtual server from Italy to Los Angeles. Ciao!

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This is a story of intrigue.

Ok, perhaps that is a bit overblown. This is really a story of schizophrenia. It is the story of a method PageParser.GetCompiledPageInstance that exhibits a different behavior depending on whether or not you have the <compilation> tag’s debug attribute set to true or false.

The problem first came up when deploying the most recent builds of Subtext with this attribute set to false. This was the natural response to Scott Guthrie’s admonishment, Don’t Run Production ASP.NET Applications with debug=”true” enabled..

However, this affected Subtext in an unusual manner. Subtext employs an URL rewriting mechanism I wrote about before. It relies on the using an IHttpHandler that is created by calling PageParser.GetCompiledPageInstance.

I will spare you all the details and cut to the chase. GetCompiledPageInstance takes in three parameters:

  • virtualPath (string)
  • inputFile (string)
  • context (HttpContext).

In the initial request to the Subtext root, the values for those parameters on my local machine are:

  • virtualPath = “http://localhost/Subtext.Web/Default.aspx”
  • inputFile = “c:\projects\Subtext.Web\DTP.aspx”
  • context = (the current context passed in by the ASP.NET runtime)

The interesting thing to note is that there is an actual aspx file named Default.aspx located at http://localhost/Subtext.Web/Default.aspx. When the debug compilation option was set to true, this method would return a compiled instance of DTP.aspx (hence the URL rewriting).

But when I set debug="false", it would return a compiled instance of Default.aspx. Holy moly!

I confirmed this by attaching a debugger and going through the process multiple times. Using Reflector, I started walking through the code for GetCompiledPageInstance until my eyes started to burst. There is a lot of machinery at work under the hood. I eventually found some code that appears to generate a URL path differently based on debugging options. Not sure if this was the culprit, but it is possible.

Setting debug="false" causes the runtime to perform a batch compilation. Thus a request for /Default.aspx is going to compile all *.aspx files in that folder into a single DLL. Setting that debug value to true causes ASP.NET to compile every page into its own assembly.

My fix is a bit of a hack, until I can get a deeper understanding of what is really happening. As I see it, calling GetCompiledPageInstance with a virtualPath that points to a one file while passing in a different physical file path to inputFile is causing some confusion. Perhaps due to the batch compilation.

To remedy this, I simply have a check before we call GetCompiledPageInstance to check the end of the virtualPath for /Default.aspx (case insensitive of course). If it finds that string, it truncates the default.aspx portion of it. That seems to do the trick for now since this is pretty much the one place in which URL rewriting would attempt to rewrite a url that itself points to a real page.

For a nice look under the hood regarding the compilation option, check out this post by Milan Negovan.

Please keep in mind that this is a separate issue from deploying your compiled assemblies in debug mode or with debug symbols. This has to do with the ASP.NET runtime compiling the ASPX files at runtime.

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Yes, yet again I have purchased tickets to Burning Man scheduled for August 28 through September 4, 2006. And you better believe I am bringing the prep back!

Bringing Prep To The
Playa

I must be an addict for pain, discomfort, and Playa dust to return a third time. But I had such a great time last time, and the time before, that I just couldn’t hold back. And this time, I am dragging my buddy (and business partner) Micah along. Still working on getting Kyle to come again.

Tags: [BurningMan]

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I am absolutely livid with my company’s bank right now and I need to blow off some steam. We had two recent deposits reversed because of a missing endorsement. This is odd because I am always careful to sign every check. Well it turns out that they changed their endorsement policy on March 31 and didn’t bother to notify us.

The problem is not that the new requirements are so onerous, they are not, but that without notification, I have no way of knowing the new requirements. Adding to the problem is that they mail the checks back (I live walking distance from our local Washington Mutual) and it has been a week already and we haven’t received our first check back. As any small business owner knows, cash flow is king. When the checks arrive is more important than the amounts of the checks.

I absolutely detest the horrendous level of service banks provide. When I moved to Los Angeles, I started with Bank of America and they were the absolute worst experience I have ever had. But WAMU is closing down on that.

Well anyways, thanks for letting me blow some steam. I needed that.

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UPDATE: I updated the article a bit to better explain decimal expansion to negabinary

Ok, here is where I go and really geek out a bit. Scott presents a simple javascript to display negative numbers as red. He takes a nice clean straightforward approach by using javascript to inject a CSS class on specific elements that have a negative number.

As his script merrily iterates its way through the page’s elements, it checks the values of the element to see if the first character is a “-” (dash). And this works just fine for the majority of you people so thoroughly stuck on the “decimal” system.

But as I pointed out in his comments, this discriminates against negative base numbering systems such as …drumroll… Negabinary!

Doesn’t negabinary sound like one in a long string of major villains to attack Godzilla and end up destroying Tokyo yet again?

Negabinary is a lot like binary’s evil twin. Rather than a base 2 system, negabinary is base -2. The beauty of negabinary is that there is no need for a negative sign (aka the sign bit). All integers, negative or positive, can be written as an unsigned stream of 1s and 0s.

To expand a decimal number into negabinary, you simply divide the number by -2 repeatedly. Each time you divide the number, you record the non-negative remainder of 0 or 1. Afterwards, you take those remainders in reverse order and there you have it, the negabinary expansion. Simple no?

Keep in mind that we are doing remainder division here. So -1/-2 is not one half, but 1 remainder 1. Likewise, 1/-2 is 0 remainder 1.

Huh?

Keep in mind this simple algerbraic formula: if a / b = c remainder d, then bc + d = a.

Thus, to expand decimal 2 in negabinary:

 2 / -2 = -1 remainder 0
-1 / -2 =  1 remainder 1
 1 / -2 =  0 remainder 1

Taking those remainders in reverse order we get 110. So 110 is the negabinary representation of decimal 2.

I remember learning that there were computing systems built (perhaps experimental) that used negabinary instead of binary. Apparently there are benefits to representing a number without a signed bit. Unfortunately, like a good evil twin, negabinary makes arithmetic operations quite complicated.

I was going to write up a whole exposé on negabinary, but the Wikipedia did a much better job than I would have. My memory of my college math lectures on alternate numbering system is pretty hazy. Throughout history, humans have tried out various numbering systems other than base 10. The Mayans used some sort of hybrid of base 20 and base 360. I kid you not.

So with a small alteration, we can adjust Scott’s script to accomodate negabinary enthusiasts.

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Downtown Los Angeles experienced a huge march today to protest bill HR 4437 and support immigrant rights and immigration reforms. I had been waffling about attending since I really hate driving to downtown (bad traffic and parking), but realized that since both my mother and my wife are immigrants, I ought to come out and show some support. An IM from my friend Kyle telling me I won’t regret it also served to jolt me out of my complacency.

Marching

Besides, my wife works on the corner where the march starts so I could just park nearby, have lunch with her, and join in the march. So I hopped in my car, grabbed a white shirt for my wife (everyone was encouraged to wear white), and headed off to downtown. Traffic was actually better than I have ever seen it on the 10 East.

When I arrived, I was greeted with the sounds of helicopters hovering overhead and people cheering. I was then assaulted by the smell of street vendor cooking in the air which instantly made me hungry and ready to part with some money despite the boycott. I proceeded to walk right through the parade in order to get to Akumi’s office.

Once there, I ran up to the roof to take some photos.

View from the roof of Akumi's
building

There are a lot of
people

The photos from the roof do not even begin to give you a sense of how many people were there. Multiple city blocks were chock full of people chanting, singing, and dancing. The air was electric.

Can somebody tell me where the march
is?

Even the little ones were into it.

A proud
American

Though this one was tuckered out.

Sleepy
Protester

The crowd was primarily latino. I had hoped to see a more diverse crowd show up in support, but I did manage to find the one other white guy.

Me and the one other white
guy

We took a shortcut to the end point of the march where everyone was gathering, but didn’t feel like braving the crowds much longer.

Rally

I stepped aside for a moment to get a better view for a picture and when I looked back, I could not see my wife. Since everyone was wearing white, it was easy for me to lose track of her. What was I going to do? Ask everyone if they’ve seen a woman wearing a white shirt, blue jeans, with black hair? That described half the entire crowd. It was a beautiful day out there.

UPDATE: I forgot to place a link to my photoset on Flickr. This contains more pictures that I took.

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ASP.NET 2.0 MVP Hacks and
Tips Scott Hanselman mentions a new book in which he is one of the coauthors featured on the cover. Yes, they do look like they are throwing the twelve sided dice on a table with meticulously painted miniatures. If you have no idea what I am talking about, you have never embraced the inner geek.

The reason I mention this is that In 2005 I wrote a post in which I presented an Abstract Boilerplate HttpHandler. This particular post was inspired and built upon Scott’s original (non-abstract) boilerplate HttpHandler. And now it comes full circle as Scott has borrowed from my borrowing, cleaned it up a bit, put a tie and suit on it, and then put it in a book.

Nice work! Now in order to one-up him, I will have to borrow from the book (which would be borrowing from a borrowed borrow) and get a Hollywood movie made. Keanu Reeves stars in Abstract Boilerplate HttpHandler I - The Pipeline of Opportunity.

So among this book of MVP hacks, they have inadvertently included a Haack.